The Star Spangled Banner 2012 Commemorative Coins Revealed

The US Mint revealed the designs of the star spangled banner Commemorative Coins which will be released next year. The Commemorative Coin Act, allows the bureau to produce and release a maximum of 100,000 pieces of $5 gold coins and half million pieces $1 silver coins to honor the bicentennial of the national anthem’s inscription. The Act specifies that the design symbolize the 1812 War most especially Baltimore Battle.

According to Richard A. Peterson, U.S Mint Deputy Director, the silver and gold coins showcase the Battle unique symbols, the stars and stripes swaying above Fort Mc Henry and the national anthem’s opening lines that are dramatically illustrated in the handwriting of Francis Scott Key.

Five-Dollar Gold Coin
The heads side of the $5 gold coin represents the theme of the Battles at Sea of the 1812 War. It shows a scene of the naval battle during the 1812 war with America’s sailing ship at the center and the British ship at the back. Inscribed with it is the phrase “In God We Trust, Liberty and 1812-2012.”

Tails side of the coin is symbolic of “The Star Spangled Banner” theme. It shows the national anthem’s first few lyrics “O say can you see” are reflected in the original handwriting of its author Francis Scott Key.

The gold coin will sell for $35 and each silver coin for $10. The funds will be utilized by the commission to pay for its bicentennial events, educational outreach and site improvement and preservation of the 1812 War.

The US Mint, established in 1972 by the Congress, is the country’s only manufacturer of coinage for legal use. It is also responsible for the production of coinage for the purpose of commerce and trade. It also creates Congressional Gold Medals; bullion coins made of gold, silver and platinum; and commemorative coins that are of proof and uncirculated quality.

Date
Categories
Tags
Permalink
Status

Published:December 28, 2011

Investing

Bookmark the permalink

Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.